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Manitoba Hydro Power Smart Home Insulation Program

Province/Territory: Manitoba

Rebate Amount: Up to 100% of the cost of insulation materials (expected average of more than $500 per home)

Description: Manitoba Hydro will cover up to 100% of the cost of insulation materials placed in attics, walls and crawl spaces in customers’ homes in which electricity or natural gas has been used as the principal heating source for at least one year.

Detached and semi-detached homes, and mobile homes on permanent foundations and condominiums are eligible for this rebate. Summer homes or cottages, unoccupied homes and homes under construction are not eligible.

Insulation work must meet specified minimum requirements and be approved by Manitoba Hydro before it is undertaken. The rebate amount provided by Manitoba Hydro is calculated based on the type and quantity of insulation materials installed.

Steps to Get This Rebate:

  1. The rebate application must be completed by the contractor hired to undertake the work, or by the building supply retailer if no contractor is hired.
  2. The contractor or retailer will submit the form and original receipts to Manitoba Hydro, and inform you when the application is approved.
  3. The work must be completed within six months of the date of the application.
  4. The rebate is issued as a credit to a customer account or as a cheque.

When the Rebate Ends:

Ongoing

For More Information:

Home Insulation Program website Phone: 888-MBHYDRO (888-624-9376).

Related Rebates


16 Reviews for “Manitoba Hydro Power Smart Home Insulation Program”

  1. dale Says:

    Hello

    I am wondering if windows and doors have any form of rebate or grant?
    An existing attached garage, that has no insullation. Does this fall into this catagory. I will be putting a gas furnace in it.
    Thank you
    I wish to do these projects very soon. I await a quick response.

  2. Bob Says:

    Hi,
    Can you tell me if the insulation grant applies to an attached garage. I have no current heat in the garage.

  3. Stan Parag Says:

    My home is approximately 2 yrs old. I have a triple attach garage. The garage is not insulated. I usully leave my rear door to the garage to keep it warm. Will Manitoba Hydro cover the cost for blow-in-insulation to the attic of the garage.

  4. Rod Says:

    Hi, My home was built around 1942 and is in desperate need of windows and insulation. I can,t afford to upgrade on my own. Could you help me find a way to get started?

  5. Manuel Correia Says:

    There is no outline on the WEBSITE on who or what kind of building generally qualifies for power smart loans.
    My question; Does a trailor home with no FOUNDATION qualify?
    Thank You!

    There is no space above for email only for mail! My email is: mdcorreia@shaw.ca

  6. Penny Johnson Says:

    I am interested in receiving by mail (not email) 3 publications from a series of 8 called Indoor Air Quality and Ventilation from Hydro:

    #2 Basement and Crawlspace Insulation
    #6 Heating Systems
    #8 Indoor Air Quality and Ventilation
    Thank you,
    Penny Johnson
    11 Hidden Oaks Cove
    Winnipeg, MB R3K 0V6

  7. Kerry Asham Says:

    I have a house approx. 65 years old. I have had a energy audit done there is approx. r-7 in the ceilings. Low slope cathedral 2×10 inch joists. I need to re-roof and re-insulate the roof as it is at the end of its life span. There is not much space between the two by tens to add insulation. what should the ceilng have in it for r factor? What is out there for grants that i can apply for? This is going to be a costly project. The house is 2500 sq feet. Kerry future2b@shaw.ca any help would be greatly appreciated.

  8. santiago mendoza Says:

    we just replaced our door a month ago and i am wondering if i am eligible for the manitoba hydro rebate. please let me know asap? thank you.

  9. Peter Paley Says:

    I am interested if replaced doors & windows are included in the Smart Home Insulation program. My e-mail is ppaley@mts.net. A response would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks: Peter Paley

  10. Peter Paley Says:

    I am interested if replaced doors & windows are included in the Smart Home Insulation program. A response would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks: Peter Paley

  11. jerry Says:

    hi. live in a war time home. home is in need of insulation, doors and windows. can you help? thanks

  12. Attic Says:

    PLEASE READ IMPORTANT!!! PLEASE READ

    At’s best to get you insulation done for the cold weather temperatures and prepare for that. U can make your house warmer but it will still cost more money because you are using more gas power to run your hvac system. Now you can get them to improve your insulation but all it does is increase the ar value in the specified region, you MUST tell the contractor to measure the R value before and after in BOTH summer AND winter values in specified region of your area to be determined by there manual J calculation. Simply put, make sure when you contact a contractor make sure they know what a calculation is..

  13. Paul Says:

    Sorry I don’t understand that last post… What I would like to know is, when the contractor does there calculation do you need to be there with them? I work so I can’t wait around all day waiting for him to come over to my place to do the calculations that are needed. I don’t mind if I only have to be home in the morning for half an hour or so while they do the measurement, but I really don’t want to wait around for the whole day waiting and waiting for someone to come over to my house to do what they need to do and just expecting that I have nothing better to do than wait around for them to do a few measurements, they should be able to just tell me over the phone if my house is good or bad, they have Internet software that can design systems for measuring house over the Internet and phone that your head would spin. There is way more technology out there you ever even believe, too bad, because I’m sure the one I call will want to come over and want me to take a week off work to be there for the checking it out and helping out. I got my shingles done last year and guy asked me to carry shingles up the ladder, didn’t I pay him for that? it costed 21k for my 1200 sqft bungalow. please let me know of someone who will just do this on there own without needing me to hold there hand the whole way. I have things to do, not baby sit contractors working on my house.

  14. Paul Says:

    There has been considerable study and debate about potential negative environmental and health impacts of insulation products. These concerns range from detrimental health effects for the individual installer to depletion of the earth’s ozone layer.
    Concerns exist when the individual installer breathes in fiberglass and mineral wool fibers; as yet, there is no accepted universal proof that either is a carcinogen. Using cellulose raises flammability issues. However, fire retardant chemicals are added to cellulose; this, along with its greater density, provides the same or greater fire safety when compared to other insulation products. For years, foam products contained CFCs, which are the blowing agents, which helped create the lightweight foams. CFCs are quite detrimental to the earth’s ozone layer. Blowing agents now used are pentane, HCFCs or carbon dioxide.
    Expanded polystyrene uses pentane. Pentane has no impact on the ozone layer, but has been implicated in increasing smog formation. The insulation materials of extruded polystyrene, polyisocyanurate and polyurethane use primarily HCFCs. These are 90% less harmful to the ozone layer than

    Critical guidelines for installing any insulating material are:
    ? Seal all air leaks between conditioned and unconditioned areas;
    ? Obtain complete coverage of the insulation;
    ? Minimize air leakage through the material;
    ? Avoid compressing insulation to less than its rated thickness;
    ? Avoid lofting (installing too much air) in loose-fill products; and
    ? Avoid thermal bridging.
    FIBER INSULATION STRATEGIES
    Fiber insulation requires care during installation to prevent compression. When installed, fiber insulation must have an air barrier on all six sides to meet the requirements of the ENERGY STAR® Thermal By-pass Checklist. The only exceptions are the horizontal surfaces in attics and when touching the floor in a crawl space. Common problems with fiber insulation installations are:
    ? Not cutting batts around wiring and plumbing in walls;
    ? Not installing an air barrier on the attic side of a knee wall; and
    ? Not creating an air barrier on all six sides of the floor insulation below a room over a garage.
    FOAM INSULATION STRATEGIES
    Foam products are primarily economical when applied in thin layers as part of a structural system. Foam products are a good choice to help seal air leaks.
    Examples of appropriate locations to apply foam insulation products include:
    ? Foundation wall or slab insulation;
    ? Exterior sheathing over wall framing;
    ? Forms in which concrete can be poured;
    ? As part of a structural insulated panel for walls and roofs; and
    ? As part of complex framing in which fiber insulation would be difficult to install.
    FOUNDATION INSULATION
    Insulating the foundation of a residence is more difficult than insulating most other areas of a residence because of the environment surrounding the insulation. If the insulation is below grade, then it must resist the pressure of the soil, provide drainage if needed, and be termite resistant. If the insulation is external to the foundation and above grade, then some method of providing protection from mechanical damage (weed eaters, etc.), must be provided. In the case of brick siding, the builder must use some method of insulating the stem wall.
    While insulating the interior of a foundation eliminates some of these difficulties, it presents its own unique problems. These problems include:
    ? Preventing air from reaching the concrete foundation wall, causing condensation;
    ? Ensuring that the insulation meets fire codes; and
    ? Determining how it can be finished.
    Carefully consider the options provided in the following sections to ensure that a complete solution is possible in each specific residence. Table 5-2 provides some information on the economics of insulating basement walls to the prescriptive level in the 2006 IRC.

  15. Paul Says:

    There has been considerable study and debate about potential negative environmental and health impacts of insulation products. These concerns range from detrimental health effects for the individual installer to depletion of the earth’s ozone layer.
    Concerns exist when the individual installer breathes in fiberglass and mineral wool fibers; as yet, there is no accepted universal proof that either is a carcinogen. Using cellulose raises flammability issues. However, fire retardant chemicals are added to cellulose; this, along with its greater density, provides the same or greater fire safety when compared to other insulation products. For years, foam products contained CFCs, which are the blowing agents, which helped create the lightweight foams. CFCs are quite detrimental to the earth’s ozone layer. Blowing agents now used are pentane, HCFCs or carbon dioxide.
    Expanded polystyrene uses pentane. Pentane has no impact on the ozone layer, but has been implicated in increasing smog formation. The insulation materials of extruded polystyrene, polyisocyanurate and polyurethane use primarily HCFCs. These are 90% less harmful to the ozone layer than

    Critical guidelines for installing any insulating material are:
    ? Seal all air leaks between conditioned and unconditioned areas;
    ? Obtain complete coverage of the insulation;
    ? Minimize air leakage through the material;
    ? Avoid compressing insulation to less than its rated thickness;
    ? Avoid lofting (installing too much air) in loose-fill products; and
    ? Avoid thermal bridging.
    FIBER INSULATION STRATEGIES
    Fiber insulation requires care during installation to prevent compression. When installed, fiber insulation must have an air barrier on all six sides to meet the requirements of the ENERGY STAR® Thermal By-pass Checklist. The only exceptions are the horizontal surfaces in attics and when touching the floor in a crawl space. Common problems with fiber insulation installations are:
    ? Not cutting batts around wiring and plumbing in walls;
    ? Not installing an air barrier on the attic side of a knee wall; and
    ? Not creating an air barrier on all six sides of the floor insulation below a room over a garage.
    FOAM INSULATION STRATEGIES
    Foam products are primarily economical when applied in thin layers as part of a structural system. Foam products are a good choice to help seal air leaks.
    Examples of appropriate locations to apply foam insulation products include:
    ? Foundation wall or slab insulation;
    ? Exterior sheathing over wall framing;
    ? Forms in which concrete can be poured;
    ? As part of a structural insulated panel for walls and roofs; and
    ? As part of complex framing in which fiber insulation would be difficult to install.
    FOUNDATION INSULATION
    Insulating the foundation of a residence is more difficult than insulating most other areas of a residence because of the environment surrounding the insulation. If the insulation is below grade, then it must resist the pressure of the soil, provide drainage if needed, and be termite resistant. If the insulation is external to the foundation and above grade, then some method of providing protection from mechanical damage (weed eaters, etc.), must be provided. In the case of brick siding, the builder must use some method of insulating the stem wall.
    While insulating the interior of a foundation eliminates some of these difficulties, it presents its own unique problems. These problems include:
    ? Preventing air from reaching the concrete foundation wall, causing condensation;
    ? Ensuring that the insulation meets fire codes; and
    ? Determining how it can be finished.
    Carefully consider the options provided in the following sections to ensure that a complete solution is possible in each specific residence. Table 5-2 provides some information on the economics of insulating basement walls to the prescriptive level in the 2006 IRC.

  16. Paul Says:

    Insulations will be discussed in this manual according to their generic types and forms. The type indicates composition (i.e. glass, plastic) and internal structure (i.e. cellular, fibrous). The form implies overall shape or application (i.e. board, blanket, pipe covering).
    2.2.1 TYPES
    1. Fibrous Insulation – composed of small diameter fibers which finely divide the air space. The fibers may be perpendicular or parallel to the surface being insulated, and they may or may not be bonded together. Silica, rock wool, slag wool and alumina silica fibers are used. The most widely used insulations of this type are glass fiber and mineral wool. Glass fiber and mineral wool products usually have their fibers bonded together with organic binders that supply the limited structural integrity of the products.
    2. Cellular Insulation – composed of small individual cells separated from each other. The cellular material may be glass or foamed plastic such as polystyrene (closed cell), polyisocyanurate and elastomeric.
    3. Granular Insulation – composed of small nodules which may contain voids or hollow spaces. It is not considered a true cellular material since gas can be transferred between the individual spaces. This type may be produced as a loose or pourable material, or combined with a binder and fibers or undergo a chemical reaction to make a rigid insulation. Examples of these insulations are calcium silicate, expanded vermiculite, perlite, cellulose, diatomaceous earth and expanded polystyrene.
    2.2.2 FORMS
    Insulations are produced in a variety of forms suitable for specific functions and applications. The combined form and type of insulation determine its proper method of installation. The forms most widely used are:
    1. Rigid boards, blocks, sheets, and pre-formed shapes such as pipe insulation, curved segments, lagging etc. Cellular, granular, and fibrous insulations are produced in these forms.
    2. Flexible sheets and pre-formed shapes. Cellular and fibrous insulations are produced in these forms.
    3. Flexible blankets. Fibrous insulations are produced in flexible blankets.
    4. Cements (insulating and finishing). Produced from fibrous and granular insulations and cement, they may be of the hydraulic setting or air drying type.
    5. Foams. Poured or froth foam used to fill irregular areas and voids. Spray used for flat surfaces.
    2.3 PROPERTIES OF INSULATION
    Not all properties are significant for all materials or applications. Therefore, many are not included in manufacturers’ published literature or in the Table of Properties which follows this section. In some applications, however, omitted properties may assume extreme importance (i.e. when insulations must be compatible with chemically corrosive atmospheres.)
    If the property is significant for an application and the measure of that property cannot be found in manufacturers’ literature, effort should be made to obtain the information directly from the manufacturer, testing laboratory or insulation contractors association.
    The following properties are referenced only according to their significance in meeting design criteria of specific applications. More detailed definitions of the properties themselves can be found in the Glossary.

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